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Lifelong Learning

Laurel Lake offers a variety of academically challenging, professionally taught courses at its Hudson campus to promote lifelong learning. Courses run from one to eight weeks, with three or four different topics offered at a time. The following programs are open to the public. To register, call 1-866-650-2100 or send an email. 

 

University Circle

DISTANCE LEARNING WITH UNIVERSITY CIRCLE

Live, interactive programs at Laurel Lake, on site or via video conference, presented in collaboration with the world class museums and educational institutions of University Circle, Inc

STORYTELLING THROUGH KATHAK: CLASSICAL NORTHERN INDIAN DANCE
September 12 @ 3:30 PM. Live from the Cowles Center for Dance and the Performing Arts, Minneapolis MN. Join Teaching Artist Derek Philips and explore Kathak, the traditional 16th century dance form of Northern India. Become immersed in cultural learning as the presenters tell stories through symbolic hand gestures. This session will include demonstrations of Kathak dance, instruction of basic Kathak symbolic hand gestures, arm patterns and footwork, as well as discussion of the historical and cultural significance of Kathak Dance.

GODS AND HEROES OF INDIA
September 19 @ 3:30 PM. Live from the Cleveland Museum of Art. The adventures of Rama and Hanuman in the Indian epic, the Ramayana, are just a few of the fascinating stories of Hindu and Buddhist gods and heroes covered in this introduction to the history and culture of India. Students are also introduced to the incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu as the man-lion Narasimha and the Buddha of Compassion, Avalokiteshvara, through works of art in the Museum's collection.

ART AND STORIES FROM MUGHAL INDIA
September 27 @ 11:30 AM. Field trip to the Cleveland Museum of Art with Curator Chat at noon, lunch, and docent tour. The Mughal Empire existed for more than 300 years, from the early 1500’s until the arrival of British colonial rule in 1857, encompassing territory that included vast portions of the Indian subcontinent & Afghanistan. The Mughal rulers were Central Asian Muslims who assimilated many religious faiths under their administration. Famed for its distinctive architecture, including the Taj Mahal, the Mughal Empire is also renowned for its colorful and engaging paintings. Many of these take the form of narrative tales that not only delight the eye but also reveal fascinating ways in which the empire’s diverse cultural traditions found their way into royal creative expressions. Curator’s Chat at noon with Sonya Rhie Quintanilla. This week the topic is Flora, Fauna & Food in Mughal India and will feature celebrity chef Douglas Katz of the restaurant Fire who has started his own spice company for home cooks. Priority registration reserved for Laurel Lake residents; to inquire about ticket cost and availability, call Betty Presti at 330-655-1492.

THE GLOBAL KITCHEN FROM THE LOCAL FARMER'S FIELD
October 3 @ 3:30 PM. On-site lecture with Beth Knorr, Director of Markets, Countryside Conservancy. Farmers’ markets are enjoying a renaissance across the country as a growing number of people are interested in connecting with where their food is coming from and the people growing it. Concurrently, farmers’ markets are being used as a tool to increase access to healthy foods to those communities lacking full service grocery stores. Join Countryside Conservancy in discovering how these trends impact the community and the farmers that participate to make it all happen.

SAVORING NORTHEAST OHIO'S CUISINE SCENE
October 10 @ 3:30 PM. On-site lecture with Vivian Goodman, WKSU 89.7 reporter for Quick Bites. There's a lot to say about the Northeast Ohio food scene because it's positively sizzling. Restaurants are opening so quickly reviewers can hardly keep up with it. National, even international attention has been paid to what a great town Cleveland has become for foodies. The Slow Food and Farm-to-Table movements are alive and well, especially in urban farms, community gardens, and the explosive growth of farmers markets.

Local chefs have become national television celebrities, and some are also activists for safe and sustainable food sources, and giving people second chances. New food products are launching from shared community kitchens and local quality grocers are stocking them.

Culinary educational opportunities for home cooks and aspiring professional chefs is top quality from Chesterland to Tri-C Metro, to Hudson. Food truck events are bringing community members together at lunch in city parks. Food truck owners are graduating to bricks and mortar restaurants. New craft brews from microbreweries, and meaderies, as well as new wines, rye, Scotch whiskey, and applejack is originating from our region.

HOW FAR HAS YOUR FOOD TRAVELLED?
October 17 @ 3:30 PM. Live from the Royal Botanical Garden, Ontario, Canada. We go to the grocery store regularly to buy food, but where does that food come from? What resources were used to get this food to you? We'll explore where some of our favorite foods come from originally and how far they have to travel now. We’ll gain understanding about WHERE our food really comes from, compare the costs of local versus imported foods and learn about WHAT we can do in our own local communities in support of food suppliers.

OUR GLOBAL KITCHEN: FOOD, NATURE, CULTURE
Week of October 24, date TBD. Field trip to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. In the new exhibition, Our Global Kitchen, we’ll explore the complex and intricate food systems that bring what we eat from farm to fork. In sections devoted to growing, transporting, cooking, eating, tasting and celebrating, the exhibition illuminates the myriad ways that food is produced and moved throughout the world. Peek into the dining rooms of famous figures throughout history, while examining the intersection of food, nature, culture, health and history – and consider some of the most challenging issues of our time. Priority registration reserved for Laurel Lake residents; to inquire about ticket cost and availability, contact Betty Presti at 330-655-1492.

CONTINUING THE WARRIOR TRADITION: AMERICAN INDIANS IN WWII
October 31 @ 3:30 PM. Live from the National World War II Museum, New Orleans LA. In addition to the most famous group of American Indians, the Navajo Code Talkers, uncover surprising and lesser-known stories of these warriors in uniform. Hear segments from the Museum’s oral history collection, including Medal of Honor recipient Van Barfoot, and the last surviving Crow war chief Joe Medicine Crow, who earned the distinction by counting coup on the Germans. With a focus on language and symbols, explore how the Code Talkers used their once-suppressed languages to successfully transmit code on the battlefront, attempt to crack the “unbreakable” Navajo code, and discuss why native language and terminology are still relevant today.

CHIEF JOSEPH: AN AMERICAN HERO
November 14 @ 3:30 PM. Live from the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, The Dalles, OR. Chief Joseph was one of America’s best known Native American leaders. This program explores Chief Joseph’s legacy and contributions to American and Native American History. Students will learn about the Nez Perce way of life before Euro American contact. Student will be exposed to the Treaty Era of Northwest Tribes. Student then will be walked through the Nez Perce War of 1877 where Chief Joseph’s band was able to outfight and outsmart the United States Army even though being great outnumbered and less equipped. Student then will learn about Chief Joseph’s life after the war and his contributions to the Native American legacy.

POCAHONTAS AND THE POWHATAN INDIANS
November 28 @ 3:30 PM. Live from History Connects Virginia Historical Society, Richmond VA. Using primary sources as well as replica artifacts created by Mattaponi Indians, learn about what life was like for Woodland Indians by examining the Algonquian speaking Powhatans in Virginia before the first English settlers made it their home. The Powhatans serve as an excellent example of Woodland Indian culture that dominated the eastern United States prior to the European contract. Identify various natural resources used by Native American men, women, and children to make their tools and clothing. Be engaged in a discussion about Pocahontas and the myths associated with her life. Much of what historians now know about her and the Indians we call "the Powhatans" is derived from English sources, as the Powhatans had no written language. Examine the reliability of these English sources in a discussion of what mysteries still remain about these people.

 

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CWRU

OFF-CAMPUS STUDIES WITH CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

This program is offered in collaboration with CWRU and the Association for Continuing Education (ACE). Courses are eight weeks long and meet in locations throughout greater Cleveland. They provide an open environment for lively discussion based on meaningful examination of shared texts

THE VERSAILLES TREATY: SIX MONTHS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD

Thursdays, September 24 to November 12 
1:30 to 3:00 PM
Laurel Lake Retirement Community
Fee $80
Instructor: Enid Kirtz
Call Betty Presti (330-655-1942) to register

Having just won WWI, the big questions were: How do you win world peace? Can you win world Peace? Where did they go right? Where did they go wrong? These are provocative questions that still plague the world today. This book discussion course studies the triumphs and failures of the Treaty of Versailles and the men involved in creating it. Required book: M. MacMillan and R. Holbrooke, Paris—1919: Six Months That Changed the World

Books - M. MacMillan and R. Holbrooke, Paris—1919: Six Months That Changed the World
Available at local libraries, or can be ordered through The Learned Owl Book Store (330-653-2252) in Hudson (15% discount to people buying the book for this class).

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ENCORE CREATIVITY FOR OLDER ADULTSEncore Creativity for Older Adults

Laurel Lake Encore Chorale - Holiday 2016 Season
Rehearsals - Tuesdays @ 3:00 PM, starting September 13, 2016.
Join more than 70 singers, age 55 and up, who meet weekly to explore their voices and learn challenging and fun choral repertoire in four (or more) part harmony under director Donna Anderson. This season, sixteen rehearsals will culminate in several Spring Concerts in local venues. 

Participants should be 55 or older; no audition required. Participation is free and open to the public. Singers may elect to sit or stand for performances. To register, call 330-655-1436 or email info@laurellake.org .